The DH Mosquito is 75

 

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The is one of the last photographs ever taken of the B AE Systems operated de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito T Mk 3 (G-ASKH, ex-RAF RR299) minutes later the aircraft crashed 1 mile west of Manchester Barton Airport (EGCB) after a problem with the carburetor in one of the aircrafts two Rolls Royce Merlin engines during a wing over caused a loss of power and with insufficient height to effect recovery the aircraft crashed during an air display killing the pilot Kevin Moorhouse and engineer Steve Watson on the 21st July 1996.

The aircraft had been operated for many years on the UK air show circuit from the companies aerodrome at Hawarden near Chester.

The Mosquito was conceived during the second world war as an unarmed fast bomber constructed entirely from wood the aircraft was known as the Wooden Wonder and was capable of outrunning the fastest German fighters of the day.

The Mosquito made its first flight 75 years ago and entered production in in 1941 and was flown by the RAF as a low to medium-altitude daytime tactical bomber as well as a high altitude night bomber pathfinder aircraft fighter and night fighter, intruder maritime strike aircraft and photo reconnaissance aircraft.  BOAC also operated the Mosquito as a fast transport to carry small high-value cargoes in all there where 7,781 built in the UK Canada and Australia of which 6,710 were built during the war

The Mosquito was also operated by the RAAF, RCAF, RNZAF and the USAAF and after the war saw service with a number of allied air forces.

The RAF replaced the Mosquito during the 1950s with the English Electric Canberra it self filled many of the roles of the Mosquito.

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